Linguistics Major - Language Studies

The Language Studies major provides students with a solid foundation in linguistics combined with the study of a language of choice. Students acquire general skills in linguistic analysis, which are in turn applied to the language of choice. Students deepen their knowledge of the language through literature classes, and gain interdisciplinary perspectives from area studies classes in other departments focusing on the country or setting where the language is spoken. Languages that students have selected in the past include American Sign Language, French, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.
It is recommended that language studies majors participate in Study Abroad, UC San Diego.

*Students whose language of concentration is American Sign Language will need to consult the faculty advisor for individualized requirements and substitutes for some classes.

Major requirements (Major Checklist):

  • Completion of 12 upper division courses with C- or better (exception: one quarter of LIGN199 taken for pass/no pass may count toward the major)
  • Two years of language instruction in the language of concentration, or equivalent proficiency
  • Lower-division prerequisites for upper-division courses in the literature of the language of concentration

A. 6 core courses:

i. LIGN 101 - Introduction to the Study of Language
ii. 3 courses chosen from:
LIGN 110: Phonetics
LIGN 111: Phonology
LIGN 120: Morphology
LIGN 121: Syntax
LIGN 130: Semantics
LIGN 145: Pidgins and Creoles
LIGN 150: Historical Linguistics
Students are advised to take these classes as early as possible, especially LIGN101, which is a prerequisite for most linguistics classes. LIGN110 is required for LIGN111, and LIGN111 and LIGN121 are recommended for LIGN120.
iii. 1 structure of language X course chosen from:
LIGN 141: Language Structures (languages selected vary)
LIGN 143: The Structure of Spanish
LIGN 148: Psycholinguistics of Sign Languages (if your language of concentration is ASL)
If no such course is available, the student must consult with the undergraduate advisor regarding a possible substitution.
iv. 1 additional upper-division elective LIGN course.
Any upper division LING course.

B. 2 upper-division courses in the literature of the language of concentration

(LIGN 144 and LIGN 146 should be taken if your language of concentration is ASL)

C. 4 upper-division linguistics, literature or area studies courses. 

Literature and Area studies courses must deal with the language of concentration or the corresponding culture/area studies, subject to approval of the faculty advisor.
  

Approved courses for this requirement include the following. Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites:

Arabic

ANSC 133: Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
ECON 165: Middle East Economics
HINE 114: History of the Islamic Middle East
HINE 155: Islamic Civilization
HINE 118: The Middle East in the Twentieth Century
HINE 119: Contemporary Middle East Conflicts
HINE 122: Politicization of Religion in the Middle East
POLI 121B: Politics in Israel
RELI 112: Texts and Contexts: The Holly Book in Islam

American Sign Language (ASL)

COMM 169: Deaf Culture in the United States

Chinese

ANRG 170/ ANSC 136: Traditional Chinese Society
ANRG 173/ ANSC 137: Chinese Popular Religion
ANSC 136: Traditional Chinese Society
ANSC 137: Chinese Popular Religion
HIEA 119/SOCB 162R: Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia
HIEA 120: Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture
HIEA 121: Medieval Chinese Culture and Society
HIEA 122: Late Imperial Chinese Culture and Society
HIEA 125: Women and Gender in East Asia
HIEA 126: The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History
HIEA 128: History of Material Culture in China
HIEA 129: Faces of the Chinese Past
HIEA 130: End of the Chinese Empire, 1800-1911
HIEA 131: History of the Modern Chinese Revolution: 1911–1949
HIEA 132: History of the People’s Republic of China
HIEA 133: Twentieth Century China: Cultural History
HIEA 134: History of Thought and Religion in China: Confucianism
HIEA 135: History of Thought and Religion in China: Buddhism
HIEA 136: History and Thought and Religion in China: Daoism
HIEA 137: Women and Family in Chinese History
HIEA 138: Women and the Chinese Revolution
HIEA 162/262: History of Women in China
HIEA 163/163: Cinema and Society in Twentieth-Century China
HIEA 164/264: Seminar in Late Imperial Chinese
HIEA 165/265: Topics in Medieval Chinese History
HIEA 166/266: Creating Ming Histories
HIEA 167: Special Topics in Modern Chinese History
HIEA 168/268: Topics in Classical and Medieval Chinese History
HIEA 171/271: Society and Culture in Premodern China
POLI 113A: East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective
POLI 130B: Politics in the People’s Republic of China
POLI 131C: The Chinese Revolution
POLI 132B: Politics and Revolution in China and Japan
POLI 132C: Political Development and Modern China
POLI 133D: Political Institutions of East Asian Countries
SOCB 162R/HIEA 119: Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia
SOCD 188B: Chinese Society
VIS 127B: Arts of China
VIS 127C: Arts of Modern China
VIS 127D: Early Chinese Painting
VIS 127E: Later Chinese Painting
VIS 127G: Twentieth-Century Chinese Art
Vis 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan

French

Any upper division LTFR course in the Literature Department  

HIEU 129: Paris, Past and Present
HIEU 130: Europe in the Eighteenth Century
HIEU 131: The French Revolution: 1789–1814
HIEU 142: European Intellectual History, 1780-1870
POLI 120C: Politics in France
TDHT 105: French Comedy

German

Any upper division LTGM course in the Literature Department  

HIEU 130: Europe in the Eighteenth Century
HIEU 132: German Politics and Culture: 1648–1848
HIEU 142: European Intellectual History, 1780-1870
HIEU 143: European Intellectual History, 1870-1945
HIEU 145: The Holocaust as Public History
HIEU 154: Modern German History
HIEU 155: Modern Austria
HIEU 158: Why Hitler? How Auschwitz?
HIEU 172/272: Comparative European Fascism
HIEU 174/274: The Holocaust: A Psychological Approach
HIEU 177: Special Topics in Modern German Thought
PHIL 106: Kent
PHIL 107: Hegel
POLI 120B: The German Political System
POLI 120D: Germany: Before, During, and After Division
SOCI 178: The Holocaust
TDHT 106: Brecht and Beyond

Hebrew

ANRG 150/ANAR 142. The Rise and Fall of Ancient Israel
HIEU 159. Three Centuries of Zionism, 1648–1948
HIEU 176/276. Politics in the Jewish Past
HINE 102. The Jews in Their Homeland in Antiquity
HINE 103. The Jewish Diaspora in Antiquity
HINE 111. Anthropology and the Hebrew Bible
HINE 112A. Great Stories from the Hebrew Bible
HINE 112B. Great Poems from the Hebrew Bible
HINE 161/HINE 261. Seminar in the Hebrew Bible
HINE 162/262. Anthropology and the Hebrew Bible           
HINE 170. Special Topics in Jewish History
HINE 181/281. Problems in the Study of Hebrew Manuscripts
HINE 186. Special Topics in Middle Eastern History
POLI 121. Government and Politics of the Middle East
POLI 121B. Politics in Israel
RELI 111. Texts and Contexts: The Holy Book in Christianity and Judaism
SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society 

Italian

Any upper division LTIT course in the Literature Department  

HIEU 119. Modern Italy: From Unification to the Present
HIEU 120. The Renaissance in Italy
HIEU 121. Early Modern Italy
HIEU 122. Politics Italian Renaissance Style
HIEU 172/272. Comparative European Fascism
POLI 120I. Politics in Italy
TDHT 104. Italian Comedy
VIS 122AN. Renaissance Art
VIS 122CN. Defining High Renaissance Art
VIS 122D. Michelangelo
VIS 122F. Leonardo’s La Gioconda 
ECON 163. Japanese Economy

Japanese

HIEA 110. Japan Through the Twelfth Century
HIEA 111. Japan: Twelfth to Mid-Nineteenth Centuries
HIEA 112. Japan: From the Mid-Nineteenth Century through the US Occupation
HIEA 113. The Fifteen-Year War in Asia and the Pacific
HIEA 114. Postwar Japan
HIEA 115. Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Japan
HIEA 116. Japan-U.S. Relations
HEA 117. Ghosts in Japan
HIEA 125. Women and Gender in East Asia
HIEA 126. The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History
HIEA 160. Colloquium on Modern Japanese History
POLI 113A. East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective
POLI 113B. Chinese and Japanese Political Thought I
POLI 132B. Politics and Revolution in China and Japan
POLI 133A. Japanese Politics: A Developmental Perspective
POLI 133D. Political Institutions of East Asian Countries
POLI 133E. Public Policy in Japan
VIS 127F. Japanese Buddhist Art
VIS 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan
VIS 127P. Arts of Japan
VIS 127Q. Japanese Painting and Print 

Russian

HIEU 134. The Formation of the Russian Empire, 800–1855
HIEU 156. History of the Soviet Union, 1905–1991
HIEU 178. Soviet History
POLI 126AB. Politics and Economics in Eastern Europe
POLI 130AA. The Soviet Successor States
POLI 130AC. Seminar: Post-Soviet Politics
POLI 130AD. The Politics of the Russian Revolution

Spanish

Any upper division LTSP course in the Literature Department  

ANAR 156. The Archaeology of South America
ANSC 131. Urban Cultures in Latin America
ANSC 142. Anthropology of Latin America
COCU 131. Cinema of the Cuban Revolution
COCU 168. Latino Space, Place, and Culture
COSF 140C. Comparative Media Systems: Latin America and the Caribbean
COCU 110. Cinema in Latin America
ECON 161. Global Integration of Latin America
ECON 162. Economics of Mexico
ETHN 116. The United States–Mexico Border in Comparative Perspective
ETHN 129/USP 135. Asian and Latina Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy
ETHN 132. Chicano Dramatic Literature
ETHN 133. Hispanic American Dramatic Literature
ETHN 135A. Early Latino/a-Chicano/a Cultural Production: 1848–1960
ETHN 135B. Contemporary Latino/a- Chicano/a Cultural Production: 1960 to Present
ETHN 136. Topics in Chicano/a-Latino/a Cultures
ETHN 138. Chicano/a and Latino/a Poetry
ETHN 145. Spanish Language in the United States
ETHN 148. Latino/a and Chicano/a Literature
ETHN 180. Topics in Mexican American History
HIEU 138. Imperial Spain, 1476–1808
HIEU 151. Spain since 1808
HILA 100. Latin America-Colonial Transformations
HILA 101. Latin America: The Construction of Independence 1810–1898
HILA 102. Latin America in the Twentieth Century
HILA 103. Revolution in Modern Latin America
HILA 104. Modern U.S.–Latin American Relations
HILA 108. Economic History: Continuity and Change in Latin America
HILA 112. Economic and Social History of the Andean Region
HILA 113. Lord and Peasant in Latin America
HILA 114. Dictatorship in Latin America
HILA 115. The Latin American City, A History
HILA 116. El Salvador and the United States: Human Rights and Revolution
HILA 120. History of Argentina
HILA 121. History of Brazil
HLA 122. Cuba: From Colony to Socialist Republic
HILA 124A. History of Women and Gender in Latin America
HILA 126. From Columbus to Castro: Caribbean Culture and Society
HILA 127. History, Culture, and Power
HILA 131. A History of Mexico
HILA 132. A History of Contemporary Mexico
HILA 161. History of Women in Latin America
HILA 162. Special Topics in Latin American History
HILA 163/263. The History of Chile, 1880–Present
HILA 164/264. Women’s Work and Family Life in Latin America
HILA 167/267. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Colonial Period
HILA 168/268. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Nineteenth Century
HILA 169/269. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Twentieth Century
LATI 120. Special Topics in Latin American Studies
THHS 109. African Heritage in Contemporary Drama: African, Caribbean, and African American
TDHT 110. Chicano Dramatic Literature
TDHT 111. Hispanic American Dramatic Literature
POLI 134AA. Comparative Politics of Latin America
POLI 134B. Politics in Mexico
POLI 134D. Selected Topics in Latin American Politics
POLI 134I. Politics in the Southern Cone of Latin America
POLI 134N. Politics in Central America
POLI 146A. The U.S. and Latin America: Political and Economic Relations
SOCI 151M. Chicanos in American Society
SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America
SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics
VIS 125F. Latin American Film
VIS 126P. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern, 1890–1950
VIS 126Q. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern, 1950–Present
VIS 126R. Latin American Photography

The undergraduate program introduces majors and non-majors to the scientific study of language in the broader perspective of a liberal arts education.

Inquiries about language classes should be directed to the Language Program advisors .

Inquiries about the Linguistics Undergraduate Program (specific questions about classes, plans of study, graduate school options, and EAP/OAP class approval) should be directed to the Undergraduate Advisors.